About me

cropped-logo.png
Octopus fascinate me and I absolutely love the Boltzmann’s equation

I have always been interested in Science and logic, but my interests are prompted by myriads of other topics too (I think I am one of those “scanners” people, as defined by Barbara Sher). I could not spend a week without reading and I feel restless and saddened if I do not “consume” some culture – be it opera, exhibition…

 

I have had a very French education, with courses in Philosophy and citizenship. Unfortunately, that also means that my English level was deplorable and insufficient until my late 20s ^^”. In French high school, one has to choose between three different sections: literature, science, and economy (roughly). I obviously choose science, but I was interested in linguistics, history and literature in general. In my small high school, we did not have much counseling, and the 3 university choices were then made via Minitel (the French ancestor of the Internet).

This is how I ended up at the Law University (Paris II, Assas) since I had set first history (oh to be an Egyptologist!), second law and third European languages. I had some interest in civil service, particularly in politics (in a vague youth sense), so I was set to study political sciences as my specialization. Unfortunately (or not?), the University decided to change the syllabus before my third year (where the specialization start), and I made a Pascal table to take a decision: continue or stop the university.

My love of science resurfaced – after 2 years of shaken knowledge foundations (the Law foundations are renewed frequently and often aleatory – it all depends on the society evolution) and 1 year of manual labor (I join our small family building company) – it was like the beacon of Gondor ~ my true call! I was thankfully accepted at the University Pierre et Marie Curie (UPMC).

Since then, I have followed my interest in nanosciences – further developed by an exhibition at La cité des sciences et de l’industrie in Paris. After my first three years in the Physics syllabus, I join a master program called Nanomat. It focused on material sciences and had an exchange semester with Uppsala University.

Of course, my stay in Uppsala allowed me to develop my under-used English proficiency and gave me the want to make a doctoral thesis in English. Which led me to my position at Uppsala University, in the Solid State Physics group. Although I had applied to another Ph.D. position (in the same group), after the interview, I was offered another position (which, to be honest, was closer to my field of expertise). I obtain a Ph.D. degree in Engineering, working on photocatalysis using metal oxides (mostly titania).

During my Ph.D., I obtain a small grant to travel to an international conference (IUMRS-ICAM on Jeju-do, South Korea) and I took the opportunity to contact Japanese laboratories to visit and discuss. To my surprise, Professor Yasufumi Fujiwara remembered me and contacted me for a post-doc position.

I was a post-doctoral researcher at Osaka University (Japan) in the Engineering department, working on rare-earth doped nitride semiconductors for light applications (LEDs). Now (October 2021), I am a post-doctoral researcher at Ghent University (Belgium) at the Chemistry department in the Physics and Chemistry of Nanostructures group, under the supervision of professor Iwan Moreels. I work on nanomaterials and their applications for opto-electronics.